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Arsenal post £380m transfer deficit but still trail in Man City, man United and Chelsea’s wake

Arsenal have spent nearly £400m on transfers over the past decade.

That pales into comparison, however, with the two Manchester clubs who each passed more than £800m.

The net transfer spending of both City and United is more than double any other English side over the last 10 years, while Brentford and Swansea are the savviest in the transfer market, according to new research.

While Man City’s net spend of £867m may have bankrolled league titles and domestic trebles, the study from Paddy Power found that their cross-town rivals have spent significantly more than several title-winners over the past decade.

The Red Devils have a total net spend of £814m – almost double that of third-highest spenders, Chelsea (£410m) – with current champions Liverpool spending £335m and 2015/16 title winners Leicester City spending just £141m.

Arsenal’s spending comes in at £380m, meaning they are the fourth highest spenders in England.

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Looking at all transfers conducted by the 92 Premier League and Football League clubs since the start of the 2011/12 season, surprising top 10 spenders include Aston Villa, West Ham and Brighton.

Arsenal are in the top four for the worst-balanced transfer dealers though – losing £244m more than local rivals Tottenham over the decade.

Rank

League

Club

Transfer balance

1

Premier League

Manchester City

-£867,280,000

2

Premier League

Manchester United

-£814,750,000

3

Premier League

Chelsea FC

-£410,310,000

4

Premier League

Arsenal FC

-£380,250,000

5

Premier League

Liverpool FC

-£335,580,000

6

Premier League

Everton FC

-£271,600,000

7

Premier League

Aston Villa

-£263,350,000

8

Premier League

West Ham United

-£256,830,000

9

Premier League

Brighton & Hove Albion

-£187,350,000

10

Premier League

Newcastle United

-£181,840,000

In fact, even Stoke City (£161m) made a greater loss than Spurs, with The Potters spending more than nine current…